Issue 29: 2015

Future Perspective

A Guide To Disruptive Technology

Innovations that transform how we live can also boost the economy and present investment opportunities.

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The history of humanity is, in a way, the history of innovation — or, more accurately, disruptive innovation. Those are the kinds of advances that nudge aside existing technologies and transform how we create, work, shop or play. Along the way they can also energize the economy and raise investor interest.

Take personal computers. As they grew popular and connected to the Internet, PCs gradually put pressure on and disrupted print media and retailers, while also creating vast wealth. Nowadays, it’s computer makers that are pressured, as consumers embrace a newer disruptive technology: the smartphone.

Connectivity

Energy

Healthcare

Transportation

3D Printing

Materials

Robotics

Illustrations by Remie Geoffroi

1 Share of U.S. Digital Media Time Spent by Platform, Comscore Inc., 2014

2 Number of smart things is projected to rise from 15 billion in 2015 to 200 billion in 2020. IDC, Intel, 2014.

3 Sequencing cost per genome: $100 million in 2001, less than $10,000 (estimate) in 2014. National Human Genome Research Institute, Oct. 21, 2014

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Investing involves risk. There is always the potential of losing money when you invest in securities.

Always consult with your independent attorney, tax advisor, investment manager and insurance agent for final recommendations and before changing or implementing any financial, tax or estate planning strategy.

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Equities Equity securities are subject to stock market fluctuations that occur in response to economic and business developments.

Technology stocks may be more volatile than stocks in other sectors.

International Investing International investing involves special risks, including foreign taxation, currency risks, risks associated with possible differences in financial standards, and other risks associated with future political and economic developments. Investing in emerging markets may involve greater risks than investing in more developed countries. In addition, concentration of investments in a single region may result in greater volatility.

The history of humanity is, in a way, the history of innovation — or, more accurately, disruptive innovation. Those are the kinds of advances that nudge aside existing technologies and transform how we create, work, shop or play. Along the way they can also energize the economy and raise investor interest.

Take personal computers. As they grew popular and connected to the Internet, PCs gradually put pressure on and disrupted print media and retailers, while also creating vast wealth. Nowadays, it’s computer makers that are pressured, as consumers embrace a newer disruptive technology: the smartphone.

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Illustrations by Remie Geoffroi

1 Share of U.S. Digital Media Time Spent by Platform, Comscore Inc., 2014

2 Number of smart things is projected to rise from 15 billion in 2015 to 200 billion in 2020. IDC, Intel, 2014.

3 Sequencing cost per genome: $100 million in 2001, less than $10,000 (estimate) in 2014. National Human Genome Research Institute, Oct. 21, 2014

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Investing involves risk. There is always the potential of losing money when you invest in securities.

Always consult with your independent attorney, tax advisor, investment manager and insurance agent for final recommendations and before changing or implementing any financial, tax or estate planning strategy.

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Equities Equity securities are subject to stock market fluctuations that occur in response to economic and business developments.

Technology stocks may be more volatile than stocks in other sectors.

International Investing International investing involves special risks, including foreign taxation, currency risks, risks associated with possible differences in financial standards, and other risks associated with future political and economic developments. Investing in emerging markets may involve greater risks than investing in more developed countries. In addition, concentration of investments in a single region may result in greater volatility.